Archives of Appalachia

A Unit of the Center for Appalachian Studies & Services at East Tennessee State University

The Moon

Be sure to catch a glimpse of the harvest moon, which is due to arrive in the Northern Hemisphere this Saturday, September 29. According to Weather Channel meteorologists, the harvest moon occurs when “the full moon closest to the autumn equinox” rises. (For more information, see the Weather Channel’s report by clicking here.)

Last week, we featured an essay by 10 year old A.B. Bowman. This week, we would like to share a second composition in which a 17 year old Bowman tests his use of personification as he gives the moon and stars human qualities.

Transcription: When God created the stars he placed among them the moon. When the sun went down on the first day and as night came on the stars began to make their appearances and sing together to worship God who made them. Then the moon began to make its appearance in the east, the stars fell back and looked on the moon with dislike because she was called the queen of night. As she began to grow old and less bright the stars were glad and finally she was lost from their view, then they were happy that she was gone. But alas! She made her appearance again. Sept 29, 1870 A.B. Bowman

There are several metaphors, myths, and folklore tales about the moon, which include the traditional tales of “The Man in the Moon,” “The Moon is Made of Green Cheese,” and “The Moon Rabbit” (common in Asian cultures). If you are familiar with these tales, which one is your favorite? Or do you have a story of your own?

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About Laura Smith

I'm the Education & Outreach Archivist for the Archives of Appalachia at East Tennessee State University. Please contact me if you have any questions about the collections or visiting the Archives.

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This entry was posted on September 27, 2012 by in 19th Century, Appalachian History, Children, From Our Collection.
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